COVID Summary for 4/19

I know people are getting frustrated with the shut down. I know each of you probably does not know anyone who is sick, so it all seems like an awful lot of economic damage for nothing. This is the problem with a strategy that is successful when nothing really happens. These same strategies were used to different degrees in the 1918 pandemic, so we can see what worked. A naysayer said that a lot has changed in the last 100 years, so it doesn’t matter. They are wrong. Viruses still spread the same way. The things that have changed have actually made it worse. More goods are shipped internationally and more people travel internationally than 100 years ago. More to the point, they travel much faster. If a virus can live outside the human body for 72 hours, you can get anywhere in the world in that time span. This article from National Geographic is worth reading – How some cities ‘flattened the curve’ during the 1918 flu pandemic

1918

~ Steve

Worth Watching:
NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – April 19, 2020 

On Sunday, April 19, 2020, DHHS announced 50 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 1,392 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several cases are still under investigation. Any additional information from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates. Of those with complete information, all are adults with 52% being female and 48% being male. The new cases reside in Rockingham (13), Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (4), Merrimack (2), Strafford (2), Cheshire (1), and Belknap (1) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (17) and Nashua (8). The county of residence is being determined for two new cases.

Hospitalizations
 

Six new hospitalized cases were identified for a total of 198 (14%) of 1,392 cases.

Community Based Transmission

Seven of the new cases have no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to increase in the State and has been

identified in all counties with cases. Most of the remaining cases have either had travel to domestic or

international locations or have had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis.

Deaths
 

DHHS has also announced three additional deaths related to COVID-19. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

• One female resident of Hillsborough County, 60 years of age or older
• One male resident of Rockingham County, 60 years of age or older

• One female resident of Rockingham County, 60 years of age or older

Cases by County

Belknap 26

Carroll 30
Cheshire 29
Coos 2
Grafton 45
Hillsborough – Other 192
Hillsborough – Manchester 258
Hillsborough – Nashua 131
Merrimack 94
Rockingham 479
Strafford 94
Sullivan 10

County TBD 2

April 19 Case Map
New Hampshire 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary Report

(data updated April 19, 2020, 9:00 AM)

NH Persons with COVID-191 1,392
Recovered 521 (37%)
Deaths Attributed to COVID-19 41 (3%)
Total Current COVID-19 Cases 830
Persons Who Have Been Hospitalized for COVID-19 198 (14%)
Current Hospitalizations2 79
Persons Tested Negative at Selected Laboratories3 12,726
Persons with Specimens Submitted to NH PHL 6,472
Persons with Test Pending at NH PHL4 298

Persons Being Monitored in NH (approximate point in time) 2,300

Information above, and archived daily updates are available here: https://www.nh.gov/covid19/news/updates.htm

 
 
NH: 1,392 positive test results 41 deaths
MA: 38,077 positive test results 1706 deaths
ME: 867 positive test results 34 deaths
VT: 812 positive test results 37 deaths
CT: 17,962 positive test results 1127 deaths
RI: 4,706  positive test results 150 deaths
NY: 242,817 positive test results 13,869 deaths
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About Rep. Steven Smith

Steven Smith is a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, serving his fifth term. Rep. Smith currently represents Acworth, Charlestown, Goshen, Langdon, Lempster, and Washington. Rep. Smith is the Chairman of the Sullivan County Delegation.
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