Fathers Day Update

240px-josephus_laurentius_dyckmans_-_paternal_adviceFather’s Day is a day of honoring fatherhood and paternal bonds, as well as the influence of fathers in society. In Catholic countries of Europe, it has been celebrated on March 19 as Saint Joseph’s Day since the Middle Ages. In America, Father’s Day was founded by Sonora Smart Dodd,[1][2][3] and celebrated on the third Sunday of June for the first time in 1910. It is held on various days in many parts of the world all throughout the year, often in the months of March, May and June.

Then, in 1908, by Grace Golden Clayton proposed the day to honour those men who lost their lives in a mining accident in the US. Though, it was not accepted then. But in 1909, Sonora Smart Dodd, who along with her five brothers were raised by her father alone, being inspired after attending Mother’s day in a church, tried to convince the Spokane Ministerial Association to celebrate father’s day worldwide and succeeded.[9][10]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Father’s_Day

fireworksWith community displays canceled, people look to launch fireworks on own

Following the decision to cancel Fourth of July fireworks in most communities this year, many residents may be taking their colorful pyrotechnic displays into their own hands.

More residential fireworks shows means a potential increase in injury, fire danger and noise complains, but safety officials say they are not any more concerned than usual.

https://www.concordmonitor.com/consumer-fireworks-sales-34688093

New Hampshire urges conservation amid dry conditions

The state is advising well owners in New Hampshire to conserve water amid abnormally dry conditions.

According to the weekly U.S. Drought Monitor, all of New Hampshire has been categorized as abnormally dry and over the past two months has received less than normal amounts of rain. Some parts of the state, including Sullivan, Merrimack, Strafford, Rockingham, Hillsborough, and Cheshire counties, have received 50% to 75% less precipitation than normal, the state said.

https://apnews.com/a5176120047c21f1ee47e5b3e711d215

localcurrent

Map of Current Positive Cases

NH DHHS COVID-19 Update – June 20, 2020

Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued the following update on the new coronavirus, COVID-19.

On Saturday, June 20, 2020, DHHS announced 37 new positive test results for COVID-19. There have now been 5,518 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in New Hampshire. Several cases are still under investigation. Additional information from ongoing investigations will be incorporated into future COVID-19 updates. Of those with complete information, there is one individual under the age of 18 and the rest are adults with 54% being female and 46% being male. The new cases reside in Hillsborough County other than Manchester and Nashua (23), Merrimack (3), Rockingham (3), Strafford (2), Belknap (1), and Cheshire (1) counties, and in the cities of Manchester (3) and Nashua (1).

Two new hospitalized cases were identified for a total of 551 (10%) of 5,518 cases. One of the new cases had no identified risk factors. Community-based transmission continues to occur in the State and has been identified in all counties. Most of the remaining cases have had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis or are associated with an outbreak setting.

DHHS has also announced 2 additional deaths related to COVID-19. We offer our sympathies to the family and friends.

• 1 male resident of Hillsborough County, 60 years of age and older
• 1 female resident of Hillsborough County, 60 years of age and older

Click to access covid-19-update-06202020.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

About Rep. Steven Smith

Steven Smith is a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, serving his fifth term. Rep. Smith currently represents Acworth, Charlestown, Goshen, Langdon, Lempster, and Washington. Rep. Smith is the Chairman of the Sullivan County Delegation.
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